Hitting the Mark

Their #SparkGoals were to meet the company's goals for CVP. With teamwork and communication, they turned around their numbers and increased profits.

 

What is CVP?

The Customer Value Program
deals with how many fresh items
are sold or discarded.

 

Two weeks.

 

 

That’s how long Abdallah A. and Sam H. had to improve Customer Value Program (CVP) stats.

 

 

The CVP stats at Store 3725 were low. “When I came in, we were at 65% CVP,” says Abdallah, assistant manager.

 

 

That meant the store was discarding 35% of its expiring produce, bakery, meat, and deli items. Walmart’s CVP goal is 75%, and their market goal is 80%. That meant Abdallah and Sam—Cap 2 supervisor—had their work cut out for them—especially after their store manager set a tight two-week deadline to get the job done.

 

 

But Abdallah and Sam accepted the challenge and set out to hit their goal. First, they simply observed. “We could see we were throwing away a lot,” says Sam, “and the reports showed we were losing so much money.” So they went back to basics, reading the One Best Way to see what they had missed.

FACTS

65%

Beginning
CVP score

 

75%

Walmart's
CVP goal

 

89%

CVP score
in two weeks

 

Some of the fixes were easy. In the past, associates “would find one apple that was going bad or had gone bad, and instead of taking it out, they just threw the whole bag away,” says Sam. So they started removing the ugly item and cleaning the bag before decreasing the price. That improved the bag’s chances of getting sold.

 

 

Other steps were more complicated. Checking perishables takes time and focus, since each item needs an associate to verify both expiration date and quality. Different items have different rules, Sam says, so it’s important to know and apply the correct standards.

 

 

Sometimes they cut up the produce and package it for quick sale. “We try not to throw anything away,” she says. “For example, we can donate some of our meat to a Chicago food bank if it doesn’t sell.”

“We hit 89% in two weeks.
Since then, we’ve stayed
at over 80%—and we’ll
never go back.”

Communication was key. “A lot of associates didn’t know One Best Way,” says Abdallah, “so we had to teach them.”

 

 

To bring everyone on board, he met with department managers, cashiers, and customer service management. Of course, he and Sam were in constant communication, too. They not only covered for each other during absences, but they constantly compared notes, trying to figure out how to improve CVP.

 

 

Abdallah and Sam met their store manager’s challenge. “We hit 89% in two weeks,” Abdallah says. “Since then, we’ve stayed at over 80%—and we’ll never go back.”

SMART Thinking

Lisa B., Fresh assistant manager for Store 1487 in Michigan City, Ind., faced similar CVP challenges. So she set a goal for her team to make improvements.

 

“We wanted to have a SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Time-Bound) goal,” she says. “So when we put down that we wanted to raise our CVP to 70%—we put a specific, attainable goal, time-bound, the whole thing. And then we put who was in charge of doing things and when we wanted to complete them. And then we followed up.”

For more stories, advice, and inspiration, download your copy of the Spring issue of Walmart World here!

 
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